Incoming SAS Ai Students for School Year 2018-19 Announcement


JuneVisitCandidatesGaretLeonardCRPblogpost

(L-R) Mrs Miranda (Dylan’s Mom), Mrs Costales (Kyla’s Mom), Kyla Costales (9th grade), Mr Sables (Hazeldee’s Dad), Hazeldee Sables (11th grade), Mrs Sables (Hazeldee’s Mom), Esther Anne Sarmiento (7th grade), Mrs Sarmiento (Esther Anne’s Mom), Dylan Rodge Miranda (7th grade), Ms Margarita “Garet” Bayan (SAS Ai Student Activities & Affairs Coordinator), and Mr Leonardjon L Buenavista, (Member, SAS Ai Board of Trustees) – Venue Photo taken at the Buenavista Family Inn (BFI), courtesy of Mr Leonardjon L Buenavista, President of BFI

We welcome our new students participating in the SAS Ai financial aid program, starting this school year 2018-19.

DylanRodgeMirandaID2

Dylan Miranda

Mr Dylan Rodge Y Miranda – moving up to 7th grade (SAS) (far left)

Esther Anne SarmientoID

Esther Anne Sarmiento

Ms Esther Anne N Sarmiento – moving up to 7th grade (Tagudin Central School) (far right)

KylaCostales9ID

Kyla Costales

Ms Kyla Alexis Costales – moving up to 9th grade (SAS) (left)

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Hazeldee Sables

Ms Hazeldee Sables – moving up to 11th grade (SAS) (right)

 

 

Today, June 24, 2018, Ms Garet Bayan, (SAAC), met with the students and their families to discuss the particulars of the SAS Ai Financial Aid program:

  • Family financial (annual gross income) requirements.
  • Applicant’s grade point average (GPA) requirements.
  • Articles of Faith and Understanding covering the responsibilities and expectations of all parties involved:  (1) SAS Ai, (2) the student’s family, and (3) the student.
  • General Guidelines – SAS Ai expectations from its students participating in the program.
  • Academic, Social, Spiritual, Personal leadership development while in the program.
  • Q & A

Mr Leonardjon L Buenavista, a member of the SAS Ai Board of Trustees, and one of the original drivers of the program since its inception, was present at the meeting. He freely shared his knowledge and expertise about the financial aid program. He covered SAS Ai history and its program success record to date, and answered most of the questions, as he helped Ms Bayan facilitate the meeting.

Join us in welcoming all our new students to the SAS Ai program! “Education is Freedom”

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Letter from a High School Graduate


Dear Sir,

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(L-R) Mr Macanas, Juzel Ann Macanas, and Mrs Macanas on graduation day

Life is like a game… a Game of Chances. There are different challenges, levels of achievement, rewards, successes, failures, and even “draws” where you don’t win, don’t lose, but just break even, or move laterally.

The most scary part of this Game of Chances, I think, is the inevitable end when you see the “pop up” that says, “Game Over!” And you are left asking, “How did I do?”

MACANASpinning

Mr Macanas pinning high honors award on Juzel Ann’s lapel

I am finally finished and successfully done with the “Achievement Level 2” in my life, called high school or secondary education. “Level 1” for me, of course, was Elementary school.

In negotiating Level 2, I endured all the emotions – happiness, sadness, hurt feelings, disappointments, craziness, embarrassing moments, foolish pride, being sickly, stressful moments – even while recovering from sickness, and eventually feeling better. And many more.

Many challenges came and went. Some disguised like homework, pop quizzes, research activities, journalistic reporting and the like. Some involved my own personal problems, notions of inadequacy, and lack of sleep. Sometimes in level 2, the Game of Chances told me I failed, or I lacked something, or I needed more improvement. But even then I still played, and never gave up giving the game my best shot.

MACANASMelauriePagaduanReggieAnnPadiwan

Classmates pose for a group photo

My allies and friends helped me get by – fortunately – and of course I speak of my parents, teachers, friends, SAS Ai, and God. SAS Ai rewarded me with awards, recognized my efforts, encouraged and inspired me to continue on. SAS Ai gave me strength, motivation, eagerness to improve, and the heart to courageously face and surmount obstacles.

Being a member of the first batch of graduating 12th grade Senior High School (new K-12 program) in our country makes me feel special. It makes me feel proud. Not getting the graduating class “GOLD” medal however, saddens me a bit because I feel I disappointed all of you. But I am happy to say that I received many “BEST” awards in different areas:

  • Outstanding Student List – first and second semester (the entire school year)
  • Parangal Awardee – Best Cartoonist and News Writer of our school paper “Aweng”
  • Best in Mathematics
  • Best in Accounting
  • Best in Applied Economics
  • Best in Organization and Management
  • Best in Business Finance
  • Best in Filipino
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My parents and I went up the stage many times to receive the BEST awards

I feel that the BEST awards were declared spontaneously, unplanned, and not part of the main program. As the unexpected winners were announced, tension covered the floor. Each and every time my name was called out for a BEST award, my parents and I walked up the stage, received the award, and went back to our seats. We did this many times and each and every time my name was called, the audience, teachers, staff, and students erupted in uproarious applause. It was surreal. They clapped, screamed, screeched, yelled, beat their seats with blunt instruments to make noise.

For each of those fleeting moments, I owned the stage. I felt like I was the only star twinkling brightly in a starless sky. I will never forget the experience. And in the backdrop, all my hard work, the sweat, the tears, and sacrifices faded and vanished into thin air, like wisps of smoke, in light of the immensity of the awards.

My parents, not to be outdone, dubbed me “Class Valedictorian”. I had to laugh a little. I knew they were way too biased. But I love them both for their loving gesture and kindness.

JuzelAnnCRPD

Juzel Ann Macanas

Now, I face the next level of the Game of Chances. I expect this step up level to be more difficult, and riskier to negotiate. Where will I continue my studies? Are there college scholarships out there for which I can qualify and apply? Questions. This much I know. Saint Louis College looms largely in my sights as my next school. I want to pursue a BS degree in Accountancy.

I am faithfully hoping God will guide and help me through my search, and guide me through my next challenge level. He always has. I know he always will.

Thank you so much SAS Ai for investing in me and my high school education. Thank you to all our benefactors, donors, and supporters. I hope I will be able to pay it forward, just as you have exemplified with your financial aid program.

Sincerely yours,

Juzel Ann B. Macanas
SAS Ai Batch 2018

 

11th Grade Class Topnotcher, Daniella Lazo


Daniella Lazo

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Daniella Lazo

Daniella graduated on top of her 11th grade class, garnering the highest of honors.

She is poised to move up to 12th grade next school year (2018-19). Congratulations Daniella. You make us very proud.

Daniella’s academic record is impeccable. With her positive, outgoing, and friendly attitude, she contributes actively to classroom discussions, participating in various learning activities.

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Daniella Lazo’s Mom pinning one of her many top award ribbons

Her class attendance and good sense of punctuality remained solid and unbroken throughout the year. She is actively involved in her community in the practice of her faith, and in the mission of her church.

Daniella stands as the perfect example of an excellent, hard working, and focused student. She helps other scholars in the SAS Ai program by tutoring and by peer-to-peer coaching. She is collaborative and a very supportive team player during school projects.

(All photos courtesy of Ms Margarita Bayan, SAS Ai Student Affairs & Activities Coordinator)

May 30, 2018 Graduation Ceremonies


Congratulations to our students (in the program) who are graduating and who made it to the OUTSTANDING STUDENT list.

Well done!

PonceOS2018Leo Joshua Ponce

Leo was in 7th grade. Today, he moves up with a well deserved promotion to the 8th grade.

Mr & Mrs Ponce proudly pinned the outstanding ribbon on Leo Joshua’s shirt, congratulating him.

They sent a very nice note to SAS Ai, expressing their gratitude for the program that helps Leo Joshua and other well deserving students attend SAS high school.

They also expressed their most sincere appreciation of being part of the SAS Ai family. Mr & Mrs Ponce assist at various SAS Ai functions held for the benefit of the kids in the program.

GarciaCarlaNicoleCarla Nicole Garcia

Carla Nicole was an 8th grade student this past school year (2017-18). She maintained good grades, good study habits and was duly rewarded with an outstanding student award in both semesters.

Next school year (2018-19)? We are sure she is poised to join the 9th grade class and to be in the list of outstanding students again. She’s that talented.

Her family, relatives, friends no doubt are so proud of her accomplishments.

Congratulations Carla Nicole on a very good year!

MusniMomCrpdMaxin Angelo Musni

Maxin Angelo is quickly becoming a household name all around the SAS campus. Maxin participates in extracurricular activities such as, drama, campus journalism, and other scientific out-of-the-classroom projects.

He attended SAS as an 8th grade student (2017-18), graduating with outstanding student honors. He is moving up, reaping his rewards, with a promotion to 9th grade come school year (2018-19).

Maxin’s Mom (see photo at left) stands so proud by her son. Congratulations to both for a job well done!

 

 

Charity Begins at Home


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Juzel Ann Macanas (right) with her Mom upon receiving her award certificate

“Dear Sir,” her email message to me began.

“I will not be able to attend the scheduled scholar’s meeting with Mr Bunoan because…”

I paused reading her email message. For a long moment my mind painted the word “Excusitis.” This can’t be.

“I have a scheduling conflict,” the email message continued.

And why is this young lady sending me this email message? I am chair of the scholarship committee and I work closely with Mr Albert Bunoan, VP Fld Ops, taking care of our scholars’ needs. It was a courtesy email message.

It turns out that our scholar-email-message-writer and 10th grade honor student, Ms Juzel Ann Macanas from Barangay Libtong, was scheduled to work with Libtong’s Local Community Charity organization that same day. She was slated to help distribute food to the homeless and hungry on that same day as our scheduled scholar’s meeting.

the face of poverty

Father and his child try to sleep away their hunger

My answer was simple and immediate:  “Juzel Ann – Go distribute food. Attend the next meeting. Let Mr Bunoan know.”

How impressive is that?

Juzel Ann Macanas, SAS Ai scholar actively involved in community volunteer charity work for the needy.

How many young people would bother to do such thankless volunteer work, much less surrender their precious leisure time? Not many I’d venture to speculate.

What Juzel Ann is doing with her free time, helping feed the poor, is noteworthy. It bodes well for her future. This same act of charity serves as a testament to the effectiveness of the financial aid program wherein she is a beneficiary.

Charity begins at home.

Under a Pile of LAB Requirements & Reports


A letter from one of our graduates:  Arthien Lovell Pelingen – SAS Ai 2012

Sunday, February 01, 2015

To: The SAS Ai, Inc. Family

From: Arthien Lovell Pelingen – SAS Ai, Inc Scholar and graduate 2012, now a Junior at the University of the Philippines (UP), Baguio Campus

Whoa... February 2015 already?
Whoa… February 2015 already?

Greetings! I just flipped the calendar to change the month and February 2015 stared me in the eye. Whoa! I realized it’s been a long time since my last update and I am deeply sorry for taking this long.

My Junior Year as a Biology Major started last August (2014). Second semester recently started and everything’s getting serious now. I can’t imagine how my Senior Year will be like. Anyways, the major subjects I am now enrolled in are:

  • Microbiology
  • Genetics
  • Limnology

BIOLOGYAlong with minor subjects, I think I’m going to lose weight again this semester due to a pile of laboratory reports and nerve-racking examinations, oral reports, etc. However, there’s a bright side to studying biology. We get to enjoy learning outside the classroom.

Actually, we’re about to do fieldwork in Sagada, Mt. Province, famous for the Hanging Coffins, to study inland water bodies there. It’s pretty exciting, right?

Oh, speaking of fieldwork, I would like to share my learning-outside-the-classroom-experiences and some studies my classmates and I worked on for the past semesters. I want to share these to give you a glimpse of what people enrolled in a Biology course actually do.

Not all stars are in the sky. This is my favorite sea star commonly known as Blue Starfish, Linckia laevigata.
Not all stars are in the sky. This is my favorite sea star commonly known as Blue Starfish, Linckia laevigata.

First, in my Invertebrate Zoology class, we did fieldwork at Bolinao, Pangasinan. We specifically studied the invertebrate species such as sea stars, sea cucumbers, corals, clams, and sea hares. I can’t describe how amazed I was when I learned all about them.

Second, we did our Plant Taxonomy class in Atok, Benguet where we collected plant species of our choice. We tried to name, classify and describe these plant specimens as an addition to the Herbarium of our teacher. (I forgot to take a picture of the finished product.)

Third, in the Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy class, we dissected a cat and a shark (the species of shark dissected is not the endangered one). And that’s when I felt like a doctor since we were dissecting actually live animals. We just felt sorry for the sacrificed cats and sharks for this kind of learning.

Misty Mountains. We were roaming around the area of study which is near the non-polluted river. (I’m the leftmost one in the photo)
Misty Mountains. We were roaming around the area of study which is near the non-polluted river. (I’m the leftmost one in the photo)

Fourth, we did Parasitology, which I enjoyed as we dealt with so many kinds of parasites. And that’s when I learned the founding of the Tagudin General Hospital and Capillariasis Center. An epidemic caused by Capillaria Philippinensis took over and overwhelmed the vast areas of Tagudin and nearby towns.

Fifth, we did Plant Anatomy and had to do the required Case Study entitled Comparative Xylem Analysis on Imperata cylindrica from Polluted and Non-polluted Rivers conducted at Tuba, Benguet and La Trinidad. We were deep into real research – from problem formulation to data gathering, to the analysis of the results. It was really a tough a job, honestly.

The Search. I and my friend trying to find different species of algae in the middle of the sea.
The Search.
I and my friend trying to find different species of algae in the middle of the sea.

Sixth, we did our Phycology class which made me more curious about marine life. When I took this subject course, I learned that “ar-arusip,” a seaweed edible in the Philippines, is actually an alga. I started a great interest to algae since our fieldwork in Bacnotan, La Union.

Pagudpud. These are my colleagues since first year. (I’m the leftmost one in the photo)
Pagudpud. These are my colleagues since first year. (I’m the leftmost one in the photo)

Lastly, our Ecology Class last semester took us to Pagudpud, Ilocos Norte. Its beauty is jaw dropping. (I suggest you visit this place when you have time for a vacation in the Philippines. I’m sure you’ll feel happy as you set foot on its white sands.) We enjoyed a 2D/2N-stay in a hotel beach resort. I can tell that this is the most fun-filled fieldwork I ever had.

Bangui Windmills. One of the advantages of having fieldworks is the fun of exploring the place itself because of the side trips.
Bangui Windmills. One of the advantages of doing
fieldwork is the fun of exploring the place itself and the attendant side trips.

What I’m preparing for now is my Summer Practical Training Program in June-July this year as required by the Department of Science and Technology Science Education Institute (DOST-SEI) for all of their scholars to apply their chosen fields in a real setting. I’m considering:

  • Philippine Rice Institute in Nueva Ecija,
  • Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources in La Union,
  • Institute of Biology in University of the Philippines Diliman and
  • National Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology also in UP Diliman.

 

Portrait of a future Biologist.  There is only one “ME,” Arthien Lovell Pelingen at your service!
Portrait of a future Biologist. There is only one “ME,” Arthien Lovell Pelingen at your service!

 

 

I like to have as many options as possible to learn more career ideas and to stimulate  interest into possible endeavors in the future.

Thank you very much for reading this letter!  God Bless you all and the SAS Ai organization!

Farewell!

Sincerely,

Arthien Lovell Pelingen – SAS Ai 2012

Big Rig Drivers


Jeepney

Jeepney

An essential part of our financial aid program (FAPHS) that helps bright kids from poor families finish their high school education is student mentoring and counseling. We motivate the kids to continually think about their plans after high school, and to preoccupy their thoughts about what they love to learn and do in terms of skills. This “thinking about the future” exercise serves to awaken and revitalize inner resolve to commit to a goal. It is part and parcel of our effort to direct, counsel and guide our young charges.

Randy, a quiet and serious kid in our program loves any kind of driving experience. On Sundays, when fares are abundant specially Church-goers and small merchants traveling from the outlying barrios or villages into town, he hangs out at the local bus stop plying the “transportation trade”. He volunteers to help load baskets of produce, merchandise, goods and then hitches a ride to town to help unload. We asked him what’s up with the gig? He smartly said that sometimes the driver would ask him to park the vehicle, or to back it out. He considers getting to drive the car his reward.

Mini van to San Fernando

Mini van to San Fernando

He loves any kind of driving, tinkering with engines, and fixing things. He has “driving” in his blood. Randy will drive for nothing – just so that he can get behind the wheel – be it a lowly tricycle for fare, or a modified World War II jeepney, or even a small mini van transporting passengers longer distances.

In our program we also invite vacationing alumni member professionals to come talk to and share with our kids what they do for a living and their careers. We had a guest from Washington state who drove semi trucks for a living. He told his story about transporting apples, peaches, pears, and other produce from Yakima to Chicago, or transporting merchandise to New York. Randy sat there listening, mesmerized. He didn’t move a muscle during the talk. He looked admiringly at the gentleman, like a starry-eyed movie fan in awe of their screen idol.

“I did some cross-border trucking usa… er…yes, picking up a load from Tacoma, driving to Canada and then on the way back I picked up another load from Vancouver and drove all the way down to San Ysidro by the Tijuana border.” He said this long sentence without taking a breath. The kids gave him blank, puzzled stares, as if to say, “What’s he talking about?”

A big 18-wheeler

A big 18-wheeler

Realizing he dumped too much unfamiliar information on them, he smiled and produced a map of the western United States, unfurled it and laid it down on a long table. The kids quickly gathered in excitement. Soon many fingers pointed at places on the map covering the entire surface. The guest speaker and Randy moved to another table.

“Sir… please tell me more about your work. Is it hard to get a driving job in America?” Randy eagerly asked.

“No. It’s not so hard. But the preparation, training, licensing, the rules and regulations, and final certification are quite demanding though,” replied the guest. “But like any other skill, the more you do it, the better you get at it.”

With palpable excitement Randy asked more questions. “What does it take to become a truck driver in America?”

“Well, I don’t think we have enough time to cover everything,” said the guest speaker. “I’ll tell you what. Come by my mother’s house this evening and we’ll talk some more about it.”