Social and Moral Development

Choices and Consequences

Choices and Consequences

Even before students contemplate applying for our financial aid program, they know about our stringent accountability expectations. Students are held accountable for their good grades, their health and safety, and their moral-social development. “Actions have consequences,” is a guideline that’s instilled, incorporated and that becomes part of their daily routine.

100% of our students graduate high school. With a zero attrition rate as the norm, we’ve never lost any of our students to truancy, bad grades, or delinquency.

Justice is blind

Justice is blind

Our indoctrination session for new students includes an extensive presentation on “The choices we make decide where we wind up in life” example scenarios. One of these short clips shows a young person who acts recklessly and conducts themselves poorly – as a matter of practice – before thinking seriously about the consequences of their actions.

The dramatization movie trailer shows what happens. A reckless act resulting in an accident. Then there is a preliminary investigation, the arrest and the trip to the police station, the phone call to the lawyer, the deposition, indictment, life in jail, the trial while represented by legal counsel, and the sentencing. These “steps or stages” are the same kind of services and processes a decent law firm would offer a client – such as, see http://mydefence.ca/  to put things in perspective and in context.

Graduation!

Graduation!

Our kids shudder as they watch the show of what can happen as a result of some innocuous, juvenile action – well, action precipitated by an attitude – “it sounded good at the time,” sort of, you know how it is. Like, taking Mom’s car without prior permission for a joyride with the gang.

Our students are also reminded that they must keep up their good grades and that they conduct themselves like the scholars that they are, on and off campus.

The end goal of every student in the program is to graduate. To be successful, they learn early on that they must make the right kinds of choices. The choice could be as simple as doing one’s homework assignment every night as opposed to doing them sporadically and sometimes not doing them at all. Or it could be as big as choosing one’s path or program after graduation.

Our actions and choices have consequences.